RSS

Tag Archives: couture school

August 2021 – Ecole Holt Couture about ‘ONE’

ONE EHC Fashion Event
Elfriede Holtkamp – Founder, EHC

It seems like a long time ago, and yet just like yesterday, since Ecole Holt Couture hosted its first fashion event ‘ONE’, that so many wonderful creatives contributed to making it a success. We’ve hosted many fashion events over the years, with all our treasured volunteers and creative experts, whom without the events would never have even lifted off the ground.  We have journeyed together and come a long way with our many students and graduates, and event volunteers we are continuing to evolve.

If you are new to EHC, this is what we do and what we don’t do. We can teach you ‘how to’ from visualizing and refining your ideas, all the in-between bits, and take you all the way to making your ideas a reality using your own hands.

Learning these skills and gaining relevant experience doesn’t happen overnight and make years to learn.  We can take the mystery out of what it takes to become competent and proficient to work at this professionally and teach you the component parts of the art and craft of dressmaking, couture, and tailoring. We don’t teach how to become a fashion designer; you already know that you’ve got great taste and ideas. We can’t teach that; you’ve either got that gift or not.

We can tell you what we’ve done to create a sustainable business, as Elfriede the Founder created an entire 65 year career on dressmaking, couture and tailoring, what worked and what didn’t work. What we can’t do is tell you how to run your own business. That depends on your lifestyle goals, your market, your vision, your resources, and your location, etc. There are so many excellent business coaches and business training options today, it really is an asset to be able to choose what suits you best.

For years we have trained and mentored students to do develop their skills, knowledge, and passion for sewing in creating high quality professional level garments. We’ve witnessed the progress, the elation when the proverbial ‘lightbulb’ comes on, and the results that the right training can achieve. We’ve also seen how hard students have worked and the dedication they put into their learning, and the sacrifices they’ve made to achieve those results. Today it is no different, but the circumstances of life have changed today.

We have also taken note of and recognized the challenges and barriers that many students today face. Whether it be with limiting finances, with family and employment commitments, and the time-limits many would-be learners must commit to full-time learning. We have responded to all these factors by changing the way we deliver will our programs.

Starting 2021 EHC have ceased to offer full-time on-site classes for Dressmaking or Couture & Tailoring, but instead will be offering our curriculum in shorter more manageable progressive modules that offers more flexibility for today’s realities.

We are developing learning space options for our students with time and financial constraints. With the advantage of using the amazing potential that online learning provides, we will offer home-study videos and online consultations, using a secure and private members platform bringing together a whole community of current and past students and graduates. And in combination with on-site workshops and events will continue to provide guidance, tuition, and support for our learners.

We say ‘learners’ because learning and sharing ideas never stops with certification awards. This art and craft always offers something new far beyond the programs. These skills and knowledge combined with new design ideas always presents new opportunities for growth and earning potential. 

With this new delivery method and our new business operating model we will still provide the same comprehensive training that we have always delivered, however at a pace that is more aligned with your own pace of learning and with multiple progressive learning modules. Still project-based learning, the cumulative result of achieving all relevant module level certifications, will offer our official dressmaking certificate and couture & tailoring diploma following successful the outcome of each respective final exam.

Another major advantage is that the cost for the training can be broken down into more manageable segments when paid for each consecutive learning module as you go, rather than paying for the full two-year program up front, as it had been mandated by the governing authority over our previous business operating model.

Although, a lump sum of several thousand dollars is a huge investment, few would-be students had that amount tucked away, and naturally needed extra student loans to access this education opportunity. In offering ongoing, and/or lifetime memberships to our learning platform will give everyone the opportunity and the time to raise funds for their education investment without being burdened with student loans afterwards that may take years to repay.  

You make the choice of how to raise funds sourced from your savings, through the support of your family, or you can continue your current employment, you could fund-raise through your community for your education using GoFundMe.com, community grants, or other crowdfunding methods. There are many ways to afford training if you’re willing to look for them. We’ve kept our modules very affordable for the type of master level training you are receiving.

Don’t worry if you are not quite sure this is the right fit for you. You don’t have to commit to joining our membership program right away. It won’t even be launched for several months, and in the meantime, we are uploading a load of free beginner videos on our YouTube channel so that you can dip your toes and test the waters first, to find out if our style of teaching appeals to you and if it works for you. It won’t work for everyone, and that’s OK too. We have a tried and tested method of teaching that we are very good at, but it’s not good for everyone. Education is and should be viewed as an investment, and no one should invest in something they don’t trust, or think will provide a good return.

Looking to the future, we are very excited and encourage you to watch this space for details and updates in 2021.

There are several ways to follow EHC: our website at http://www.ecoleholtcouture.com [which still needs major updates BTW], our FB page and Twitter which are current, our Blogsite, our YouTube channel all accessed from our website, and our Newsletter that you can sign up for by request at info@ecoleholtcouture.com.

Thanks to you for following us so far! Please feel free to share this with your friends and family.

cheers! J

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 3, 2021 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

July 2021 post – Ecole Holt Couture

Hi everyone! Hope you are all doing well in this almost ‘post’ pandemic period. I say almost, because with all my fingers crossed we won’t be experiencing a fourth wave of Covid19 or its variants. Please do take any precautions you feel comfortable with wherever you go!

It seems fitting, to expand on my thoughts inspired by this photo shared on Facebook by the Embroiderers Guild of Victoria – sourced from http://ouvragesdedames.canalblog.com about the exquisite  handmade button holes  decorated around the edges, dated back to 1828.

Looking at this lovely sampler, embroidered on quite possibly hand-woven linen, you can see the care and precision of the work that has been put into these buttonholes with the finely stitched decoration surrounding the hole. This embroidery was created to enhance a purely functional detail such as a buttonhole.

As with all hand stitching, it requires experience to be done well. Not only that, but it also creates a signature upon the project being done. Let me refer you to the practice used in Men’s tailoring.

In Men’s tailoring there are divisions of labour in the making of bespoke items or suit of items. One person will be the cutter, another will work on jackets [coats], another the trousers, and another will be creating the vests and another the shirts. The detailing work is also divided into another division of labour where one crafts-person will do nothing else but hand-stitch buttonholes. One can see that each crafts-person will have a particular style which you can visually recognize. This means that even though there may be many people creating buttonholes, there will never be two project pieces that are ‘identical. They will be ‘identifiable’, in effect, creating that crafts-person’s signature. So, when inspecting a piece that has been handmade in the past, you can identify, whether more than one person has been working on the same piece.

It is the same with all handwork, and in the piece pictured below. Even if two highly skilled people were to embroider the same pattern, they would not look exactly the same. They would be identifiably different.

In couture and tailoring, this is also true. Even though, two or more people will have been trained by one master, all work that is created will be identifiably different. This means, that although one designer may try to copy someone else’s garment, it will never be exactly the same. However, at Ecole Holt Couture we teach our students to never copy any garment. Each garment in couture [and bespoke tailoring] must be one of a kind. In effect, just creating a piece by single maker makes it unique because no one can exactly copy your exact methodology or your exact techniques. This is encouraging because it is tangible proof of your own unique work, if any doubts should arise.

This buttonhole sampler was made many years ago, but today our clothing is much simpler in style, and much less detailed. However even on simple clothing or a simple design, one can still add some detailing method either on the surface or on the inside of the garment which creates a signature or a style either of the creator, or the wearer, or both. This will identify a garment as uniquely yours.

At Ecole Holt Couture we emphasize the unique nature of ‘hand-made’ or creating things by hand. Beginning with the thought process that goes into creating a garment which is unique to each individual. From the intake of information, the planning, sketching, the drafting of a new pattern, the creation of a toile for the first fitting, the unique layout of the pattern pieces on the final fabric, each construction stage, to the finishing and the detailing will all be unique to the creator. And each designer/creator will in fact, be leaving their signature upon each garment. This is one of the most exciting aspects of couture and tailoring. Each and every piece is unique, not only in style but in its execution.

Photo source: click on image.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

We’ve reached the end of Term! Sort of.

We’ve reached the end of term, as well as the end of the 2019-2021 Certificate Program. Sort of.

Because of the accumulation of Covid19 restrictions during the last 18 months, putting us a little behind schedule, we haven’t actually completed the term. So we will continue our classes for another couple of months with a flexible schedule so that all current students receive all the instruction and input that had been our method for the last 13 years.

When that has been accomplished we will plan the celebrations that the graduates are so looking forward to. We are very impressed with their commitment and talent, and anticipate a very interesting result!

Stay safe, enjoy the summer… will keep you informed!

Cheers! J

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 4, 2021 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Indicators for success at Ecole Holt Couture

It is important to know beforehand if the career you’ve chosen to invest the time and money in is the best one for you. This short video may help you to decide whether a career in Couture, Tailoring or Dressmaking is appealing to you and whether Ecole Holt Couture is the right school for you.

Ecole Holt Couture School of Couture Sewing and Design is specifically aimed toward people who are dedicated and passionate about 1) sewing, 2) love the notion of working solo, or at least in your own space, 3) are concerned about the sustainability of fashion in our natural environment and how to do our part to protect our environment, 4) want to earn a sustainable living, and see a need in your local economy, 5) are not drawn to running as part of the pack, but thrives on standing out, and have the courage to swim upstream, 6) consider yourself an artist or artisan, 7) looking to develop a fulfilling, life long career – one in which you can always learn something new. This is not a dead end job. And finally, 8) you love working with your hands, your mind and your soul.

https://youtu.be/1Jx6ItLynJs

 

Tags: , ,

Lesson #2 – Petite is Powerful – tips for a great fit.

If you are like me, considered a petite size, then your proportions are slightly shorter from the shoulders to the waist than a standard size, and you all know what I think about ‘standard’ sizes. But being ‘petite’ may also reflect that you may perhaps be relatively shorter in stature than most of your contemporaries in North America. Not at all if you are in most parts of Asia and in some parts of Europe.

Wearing off-the-rack and ready-made garments always seem to appear slightly ‘off’ because, petite manufactured garments are mostly only adjusted for the above mentioned variance, or worse – adjusted for shorter arm and leg length as well which may not apply at all to you (or to me). These adjusted variances may greatly reduce the choice in ready-made or off-the-rack for you to look amazing.

If you want to look your perfect-size ‘perfect’, then every component needs to be made in proportion to the whole. That doesn’t mean a petite cannot wear a large pattern print, or conversely that being tall you cannot wear small prints. Only that the proportions must be adjusted accordingly as is true to haute couture and bespoke tailoring.

In this example, notice that in her riding jacket all the components – lapel size and stance, buttoning, pockets, sleeve length (and armhole circumference), waist cinch, and jacket length are all relative to proportion. The trousers again are the right length and leg width. Any one of these elements out of proportion will throw the whole look ‘off’.

A petite can look positively overwhelmed or underwhelmed because of the lack of choice. Remember that in garment manufacturing, realistically it can only serve a small section of the market offering a limited range of ‘sizes’ to be profitable. That pretty much excludes the other 90% of the population. It is not you, you are a perfect size.

Cheers! J

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ecole Holt Couture Information Seminar

Ecole Holt Couture will be hosting its Information Seminar for those interested in enrolling, on
Thursday April 14th from 7 to 9 pm.
You must register for this free information seminar by email: info@ecoleholtcouture.com
*Registration deadline date for the seminar closes Monday April 11th.
[due to limited spaces available EHC reserves the right to reschedule or schedule and additional Information Seminar date]

General admissions information:
First, to make your application for enrollment, contact EHC by phone or by email requesting a Prospectus.
Then, because École Holt Couture School of Couture Sewing and Design’s curriculum is truly unique, we schedule an information seminar at the school to help you decide whether Ecole Holt Couture School of Couture Sewing and Design is the right fit for you.
The information seminar is presented to further explain EHC’s mission and goals, curriculum and instructional methods, and to answer your specific questions so you can make an informed decision about your education opportunities. (more scroll down)

EHC-639
In summary – what you need to know before you start.

Admission Requirements
Standard Admission:
• High School Diploma or Equivalent (GED, diploma from another province)
• Parental/legal guardian signed consent if under the age of 18
• Demonstrate an aptitude for sewing or fashion, passionate commitment to couture fashion
• Successful completion of interview with EHC

Mature Students:
• Must be out of school for at least 2 years
• Minimum of 19 years of age
• Must complete and submit a high school equivalency exam result (GED or CAST) to EHC
• Demonstrate an aptitude for sewing or fashion, passionate commitment to couture fashion
• Successful completion of interview with EHC

In addition – ESL Students:
• Fulfill the above with the addition of submitting successful result of standardized ESL test ( eg . TOEFL) to EHC

About the School Year – what to expect

Each school Year begins in early September and ends the following June. The year consists of 3 Terms which each run 10 consecutive weeks, including a break between each term. Classes are held twice weekly for 10 hours, or 5 hours per class, including a short lunch break. The remaining 3 days are required for lab (or homework) mandatory studies which takes up 30 or more hours per week. You must expect to dedicate 40 hours per week for classes and homework during the year to successfully complete each program.

Very important: Students must have free access to a dedicated work space or studio in which to do homework projects and assignments. Ideally a separate room, with good natural, ambient and task lighting, preferably self-contained and protected from through traffic and everyday disturbances. (What we are saying is, using a kitchen space is not acceptable). Your studio space could be accommodated within your bedroom area – if no other suitable space is available.

How to go about making an application
1. Request a Prospectus by telephone or email.
2. After you receive a Prospectus, review all the information carefully.
3. Return your signed and completed application forms, by the stated deadline. Only completed applications are reviewed by the school’s selection committee.

Letters of acceptance (plus required tools/materials list), or letters of regret, or waiting list letters, are forwarded to you within 6 weeks of your application being received by EHC’s registrar.
*Email info@ecoleholtcouture.com for current application deadlines.

How much does it cost for each Program

Certificate Full Tuition $23,700
Registration Fee $500 – This fee is later deducted from tuition fees
Books $250 – Students are given a resource list and are free to purchase their own copies
Equipment $2000 – Most of this initial equipment cost is good for both programs and should last you for many years thereafter.
*Materials $3000 – Students are given a resource list to search out and purchase their own required materials as they become necessary for projects.

Diploma Full Tuition $27,300
Registration Fee $500 – same as above
Books $500 – same as above
Equipment $2400 – This advanced equipment in addition to the Certificate program equipment, is useful not only for school use, but for use after graduation for many years to come.
*Materials $5000 – same as above

*Materials costs vary widely and are subject to market fluctuations.
A financing schedule for Tuition fees may be available for Registered students.

What do I do with all my projects at the end of the program?

Each year in November EHC presents a fashion show, open to the public, to feature the couture garments students have created. Graduates of the Diploma Program will have developed outstanding wardrobe items consisting of approximately 30 – 40 full scale, plus 10 – 20 half scale couture garments, and accessories valuing more than the total investment in tuition fees and materials combined.

Each project garment increases in complexity of style and design, and reflects, of course, the student’s increasing level of skill and competency. All garments created during the program are designed to be completely wearable and reflect a tangible portfolio, which exhibits the skills and experience graduates will have acquired during their time at Ecole Holt Couture.
Ecole Holt Couture April 14th Information Seminar
[Please note that at this time Ecole Holt Couture is not able to accept international students.]

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Happy New Year 2016!

We posted this one year ago, but still a good story to illustrate a point about the value of couture sewing skills…Happy 2016! I’ll leave this one with you as well: Without Craft, inspiration is a mere weed in the wind.

Once upon a time there was a very rich man and his wife spending some quality time together on their private south pacific island. Even with its remoteness it had every modern convenience. Solar panels for electricity, running water, and even 4G Internet access. Everything you could possibly need was there. A beautiful house, airstrip, dock, boat house, deep-sea fishing boat, and several guest cottages on its beaches.

He arrived following several strenuous business trips with his wife, who had completed a major shopping spree from Paris, Milan, London, to Tokyo. There was nothing that the couple could not buy. His wife had just procured lengths of the most elaborately hand-embroidered French silk, the softest Kashmir wool, the most luxurious Italian silk velvet, and the finest English worsted. The best that could be made, very expensive and all quite unique.

Because this man was also very generous he regularly invited friends and relatives to his island, but he also invited strangers from time to time to share in his good fortune. This time he invited three young, and very promising, fashion designers to the island as a reward for their contribution to one of the many charities he supported.

Each of the three individuals saw this opportunity differently. One was very ambitious and viewed each day as potential for new business and so brought an iPhone, laptop, latest look-book, and a few new design ideas to present, just in case. The other viewed this as a good time to get on with a project or two without distractions, and so managed to pack a compact sewing machine, sewing kit (thread, pins and scissors), and some new patterns but decided to investigate locally made materials on the island to experiment with. The third accepted this, as a time to relax and not worry about anything. To absorb, and enjoy this once in a lifetime experience.

While on the island, which was very tiny indeed, it became apparent just how remote it was from civilization. The owners of the island were very hospitable and made time to visit with each of their guests, making sure that everyone was quite comfortable. One night they invited the three young people to dinner at the big house. Nothing but the finest was offered, the freshest fish caught just hours earlier, the best quality vegetables and most exotic fruit flown in from the nearest islands, and the finest wines.

The conversation turned to each guest to find out what their hopes and aspirations were for the future. One was confident that someday they would become world famous, so that everyone would want to own one of their designs. The other was hopeful, that with experience and some help, they would be able to manufacture highly popular collections selling around the world. The third confessed to wanting to be creative every day, to being content, and wanting to make other people happy. The others all sniggered at the third’s response, and privately thought how impractical and unrealistic that would be.

Curiously, the rich man’s wife asked more questions about why this would be a considered career choice. After all, doesn’t one need a lot of money to be able to have everything one’s heart desires? “For instance, we have everything one could possibly want, a good income, good health, and access to the best of everything. This doesn’t come without hard work and sacrifice of course”. All had to agree, and continued to enjoy a pleasant evening of good food, conversation and exchange of ideas.

Later, the rich man’s wife was delighted to show the three young people her exquisite fabric finds, knowing they would share in her excitement. As expected, all three were indeed thrilled. Also, as an almost instant reaction, they offered to design something for her using these fabrics. “Oh, but, I couldn’t just let anyone touch these precious fabrics, only someone with considerable experience”. They asked who she knew, that had such experience. “Well, I don’t really. I’m a bit hesitant about asking anyone!”

The first young designer offered to create the most fashion-forward designs, and would start on it straight away. The second, began to research the latest trends to present. Meanwhile, the third asked questions about what the rich man’s wife dreamed for herself, what were her requirements for the coming year, and what type of things she loves to wear. “This is all wonderful, but it still leaves the dilemma of who will make these amazing designs for me?”

Not to worry the first designer said, “I have some really good people behind me who will get it done right”, the second designer remarked, “I will make it myself, it won’t take long. I can usually run things up in a few hours, a couple of days at most!” The third’s reply was “I would love to make it for you, it will take some time. I want to make sure everything fits just right, and makes you look marvelous. Your fabrics will deserve the utmost attention, for the most part they will be hand-sewn”.

That night a tropical storm knocked out the 4G Internet access, the docks were damaged, and the airstrip was littered with debris from broken branches. Fuel supplies were so low that the generators couldn’t be run for more than just the bare essentials – such as pumping fresh water. Repairs would take some time.

The first designer conceded, “Well that pretty much finishes my plans, without the internet I can’t communicate with my team, my laptop battery is low and in need of recharging, but I can’t do it without electricity”. The second designer complained that without power the sewing machine was useless, and it was too late to order patterns on-line. The third said, “No problem. Let’s get started”.

In wonderment, the rich man’s wife asked how this is possible without any equipment! “I have my hands, I never travel without my emergency sewing kit, and if you have a ball of string somewhere, that’s all I need.” And so proceeded to take her measurements with the ball of string, sketched some ideas on paper for her approval, and drafted the patterns on old bed sheets. After assembling the mock-up designs, they were fitted exactly to her figure. Then used as the pattern to cut her prized fabrics.

During the following days, the rich man’s wife witnessed how the garments were being created piece by piece, all with the greatest care and attention to detail. Every pattern was skillfully matched at each seam. The garments were fitted a few times making sure they were comfortable and flattering to her figure. Then – one day the clothes were complete! “Oh my, I have never in my life seen such craftsmanship, such beauty, but mostly I have not felt so comfortable in my clothes, and felt so good about the way they make me look! I could see your joy while you worked, and why you love creating such wonderful things! How can I thank you enough for what you have done for me?” The young Couturier replied, “The opportunity you’ve given me has been priceless! Here is a detailed invoice of what you have received in exchange for my expertise.” The rich man’s wife never again wanted what everyone else could buy! Do you?

(Not The End) Just The Beginning – Cheers J

Ecole Holt Couture 2015 Fashion Event opening welcome

Ecole Holt Couture 2015 Fashion Event opening welcome

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Questions, questions and more questions at Ecole Holt Couture!

Questions, questions and more questions at Ecole Holt Couture!

After being on a blog hiatus for a bit, we thought that we would start our blog back up in September 2015 with what we do with student’s questions, and we encourage our students at École Holt Couture – School of Couture Fashion Sewing and Design to ask lots and lots of questions. After all, we are here to share what we know about our area of expertise.

Some questions require multi-dimensional answers. In other words, the answer depends on the specific situation “if this, then do this”, when all that is wanted is a simple directive to “how do I do this?”.

So, the strategy goes like this. At the very beginning, we say “it doesn’t matter why, just do it this way”, which later progresses to “do it this way, but in certain situations do it the other way”.

In advanced classes, we give several answers to a single question, but each answer is quite relevant. Later still, the students are encouraged to come up with their own thought-out solutions and to bounce them off the wall with us.

Finally, the goal is that students work through their questions and problems based on relevant research plus what they already know in some form, and can defend their solution paths. It is at this point when we can breathe out a happy sigh and know that we’ve done our job reasonably well.

There are better ways and not-so-successful ways of doing things to achieve a result. Nothing is written in stone, and it is universally accepted, or least it should be, that no one should have to reinvent the wheel to be a highly skilled creative type, and yet still considered to be ‘original’ in their art form.

No single person knows everything there is to know about any single thing. So we continue to learn throughout our careers and lives, and we learn from the experience of others before us. It saves a tremendous amount of learning time, unless we are stubbornly determined to engineer a new pattern for the wheel.

We also encourage you to never stop asking the tough questions. Never be satisfied with a simple answer, but don’t over complicate things just because you can. The best solutions are sometimes very simple and sometimes very complicated. Sometimes they require a team to figure it out, sometimes they just require an unexpected ‘Ah-ha’ moment. Sometimes they need in-depth explanation and sometimes they just need an act of faith.

Diploma

Diploma

Certificate

Certificate

First-Ever Day in Class this is what you learn…. cheers! J

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday March 31st, 2015 – Back to class

We’ve just left two weeks of Spring break behind us. Well, it wasn’t so much a break as quiet work-time to catch up for most of us here, and part one of the final Certificate exam is being written today. The programs are pretty intense, and if you do get behind even for one or two days, the work piles up incredibly quickly. Students all work very long hours for the duration of the programs, and as an administrator as well as instructor, my job doesn’t end at the close of class either. It usually runs late into the evenings and into weekends replying to emails and keeping up with necessary paperwork. It didn’t get any easier when Ecole Holt Couture became a designated Private Vocational Training institution licensed by the Alberta government of Advanced Innovation and Education department.

We often get questions about EHC’s programs and the equivalency of its certificate awards to other degrees. So here it goes.

Both Ecole Holt Couture programs are recognized by the Advanced Innovation and Advanced Education government department of Alberta, Canada.

EHC’s Dressmaking Certificate program is designed for self directed employment as well as the prerequisite program to enter the EHC Couturier/Tailoring Diploma program. The Diploma program is designed for self directed employment or free lance work, as well as entry level positions for apprenticeships. As such, there is no equivalent to our Certificate and Diploma programs. The entire curriculum is unique and original, written by the Founder, based on her education and 60 plus years of professional experience in the trade of couture and tailoring in Europe and Canada.

The reason that Ecole Holt Couture was established and its sole existence is to preserve and pass on traditional practical skills with its related professional technical knowledge not currently being taught in fashion or design institutions. As we’ve ventured to more modern approaches, focusing on off-shore manufacturing and marketing, the nature of educational programs have evolved to meet the demands of the fashion industry.

What is being left out is formalized training in couture and tailoring. Expert mentoring, the transference of knowledge and sharing of experience, not least of which is teaching the fundamental skills for a couture and tailoring career alternative – not typically included in the ‘industry’ statistics today.

So where are the statistics for couturiers and tailors to be found then, if not in the fashion industry? In our research, we have found them to be placed squarely in the arts and culture sector as craftsmen and artisans. see Cultural Human Resources Council

At EHC we do not teach quick and easy step by step do-at-home projects, that follow trendy designs adapting ready made patterns for sewing enthusiasts nor do we teach how to manipulate CAD programs. This training is meant for the serious career-minded individual to gain the expertise to take an original design idea and craft it into a fully formed product, by your own hands. What then is the exact degree equivalent, remains a good question. Cheers! J

 
2 Comments

Posted by on March 30, 2015 in College degrees

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Form │ Structure │ Design – EHC Couture

EHC trademark

EHC trademark

It is said that Balenciaga (couturier and designer) enjoyed traveling by train inspired by what he saw from the window, to generate ideas for new forms, silhouettes and creations. Pumpkins in the field inspired his balloon skirt, a canvas tent his tent dress, sunbeam pleated skirts from the rays of the sun. Inspiration came to me for the sculptural figure you will see displayed at the bottom of the stairway entrance to the School. One first recognizes its form or shape, then its structure and then the design of the fabric draped around it. These three elements are the basis of what Ecole Holt Couture teaches: form, structure and design.

As with any new language one must first learn to recognize its alphabet, in music for instance. Before writing music, not least a complex symphony, one must first learn to recognize the notes and their position on the staff lines, time signatures, and get a feel for rhythm. To perform music from written score, one must first learn how to play the instrument. And before any instrument can be played, it must indeed, first be created.

Before anyone can create couture, they must learn the basic stitches and their applications, details and combinations of details. Then how to use the tools, and also how to make certain tools. That is what the EHC Sampler resource library is for, so that each student can first learn professional couture sewing basics. In the process, students build their own personal resource library for future reference.

In Terms one and two, the 9 projects required must be wearable unlined garments of pure cotton and pure linen fibers, each project introduces increasing complexity. In Term three, students are already creating a four piece business suit including a blazer, skirt, trousers and vest, each fully lined. The suit must be made of 100% pure wool and natural fiber linings and interlinings.

Term 4, 5 and 6, the projects in the second year are all made of 100% pure wool, silk fabrics and including high quality lace. All these projects are fully lined and structured. Each project throughout the curriculum has been carefully selected as a classic garment with an identifiable origin. Students learn to recognize style from trend, and understand how styles cycle and recycle through time. They learn how to build a client-specific (which is not the same as a ‘targeted market’) wardrobe, and design a collection that is appropriate to a specific individual, thereby applying their own creativity.

In year three, Terms 7, 8 and 9, students learn the skills of hand knitting, and how to work with pliable leather. They learn how to tailor both ladies and men’s garments in the haute couture and bespoke methods traditional to each profession. The techniques for mens’ and ladies tailoring are not the same.

In the fourth year and final three Terms, students create a formal tailored tuxedo outfitting either a man or lady, complete with cummerbund, bow tie and tuxedo shirt. They learn how to work with fur, handle velvet, how to embroider, create cutwork and hollow work, bead work, and smocking techniques. Students create accessory items such as hats, and detachable collars. They practice different methods of pattern making to flat pattern drafting in the previous years, such as body draping and transformational pattern making.

At the end of four years, the graduating student must create a fully structured Ball gown or Wedding gown as their ‘master piece’ without the help from an instructor. When successfully completed, graduates are entitled to refer to themselves as professional couturiers and tailors with the skills to begin their career journey. Formally trained couturiers and tailors are artisans as well as craftsmen who continue to experiment and gain experience throughout their careers, each year becoming more proficient and more highly sought after.

Instruction time at Ecole Holt Couture

Ecole Holt Couture School of Sewing and Design is where students come to learn on a full-time basis earning an EHC Dressmaking Certificate and EHC Couturier/Tailor Diploma. Each student must maintain an 80% minimum grade level assessed every 10 weeks to continue on into the next term. There are three terms each school year. Each Program is two years in duration, totaling 12 terms or four years. Only successful graduates holding an EHC Certificate Dressmaking Award may enroll in the EHC Diploma program, having acquired the required skills to enter the Couturier/Tailor program.

At the beginning of each class day we assemble for a short meeting, after which the day is spent covering EHC course material relevant to the schedule. Rather than assigning reading material as homework, we engage the entire class (of six people maximum) so that questions that come up can be addressed immediately for everyone’s benefit. This normally consumes about 20 to 25 percent of the class day. The remaining 75 percent of the day is entirely supervised hands-on work.

Every project initially begins as a working sketch drawn by hand within imaginary box outlines, according to a ‘client’s’ proportions, and later progress to freehand drawn realistic illustrations with student designed garments in contextual backgrounds, and finally to fashion magazine type figures with more artistic expression.

EHC’s goal is to train the mind, hands and eyes to work in harmonic synergy producing a finished product. Taking appropriate measurements, documenting them, and then applying those measurements creating an original pattern according to the design. First fittings on the client are performed with a ‘toile’ created from that pattern. Then the actual garment is prepared from the toile. More fittings and continuous structuring, with a 50/50% ratio of sewing/pressing. One secret of success to professional results lies in pressing at the right time using the right methods.

The entire couture process is 80% hand worked, sometimes more and sometimes a bit less.The final product must be as finished and as beautiful, on the inside, and in between the layers as on the outside.Couturier and tailoring students bring their designs to reality.

In professional practice, before the final owner of the garment takes possession of it, they must try it on one more time to make final inspection of themselves in the mirror. Only then can it be allowed to leave the couturier or tailors studio. It is the couturier’s ultimate level of gratification to see a client’s eyes light up. To hear them proclaim its true comfort and fit, beautiful finish and flattering style, is the true confirmation of success.

Many do try to ‘copy’ original (haute) couture creations, but they cannot ever be truly duplicated.

created by Elfriede

created by Elfriede

What struck me as a good comparison to this was inspired by a documentary shown on PBS TV about one Stradivari violin made in the 17th century and how truly unique it is. The “Stradivarius” has become associated with excellence; to be called “the Stradivari” of any field is to be deemed the finest there is. Looking deeper uncovered certain experts had analyzed the Stradivarius violin, along with one Guarneri violin also made in the 17th century. From the outside they both looked so similar, almost identical. Each one was of the highest quality and wonderfully crafted, but each had very distinct sounds. But what made them so distinctly different?

The wood used to make both violins had a very particular quality and density.The Stradivarius was crafted to perfection on the outside, inside, in every groove and chiseled stroke. The varnish recipe used for the finish, also believed to be part of the reason for its unique sound died with the maker at the end of his 70 year career, and is still a mystery to this day. The other violin was also crafted to perfection on the outside, but the inside – was left in a somewhat less state of perfection.

Expert comments suggested that the Guarneri violin was somewhat easier to play, more forgiving, and had a larger range of tone. But it didn’t have the fineness of tune of the Stradivarius. The Stradivarius was more difficult to play requiring a very precise touch of the bow. It is said to be very unforgiving, so that only the most accomplished violinists can bring life to it producing such an exquisite sound that has never yet been replicated. The Stradivarius is still being played today, 300 years later, sounding as excellent and as unique as was at its first debut.

Expertly made, well fitted haute couture and bespoke tailored garment cannot be identically copied. The secrets lay within the mind, the soul and in the skilled hands of the creator, and is proven by the workmanship on the outside, inside and in between layers of every piece.

Elfriede Holtkamp
Ecole Holt Couture, Founder

_53555675_strad464getty

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,